.
BEENIE MAN
AUGUST 2, 2004: LETTER OF APOLOGY RELEASED BY VIRGIN RECORDS
In a statement released Tuesday by his record label Virgin, he said: "It has come to my attention that certain lyrics and recordings I have made in the past may have caused distress and outrage among people whose identities and lifestyles are different from my own."While my lyrics are very personal, I do not write them with the intent of purposefully hurting or maligning others, and I offer my sincerest apologies to those who might have been offended, threatened or hurt by my songs. As a human being, I renounce violence towards other human beings in every way, and pledge henceforth to uphold these values as I move forward in my career as an artist.". (
365gay)

AUGUST 3, 2004:The following day, Clyde McKenzie, head of public relations for Beenie Man's management company Shocking Vibes, told Radio Jamaica that the statement was "not an apology", that it was initiated by Virgin Records not by Beenie Man, and that Beenie Man reserved his right to continue criticizing "the homosexual lifestyle", of which he did not approve. (
365gay) (OutRage!)

AUGUST 22, 2004: Once onstage in Jamaica, Beenie Man has personally denied he had ever apologised for his 'kill gays' music. To prove it, he performed a medley of his 'chi chi man' songs. That event took place on August 22, at the Red Stripe Summer Sizzle concert at James Bond beach, in Jamaica. The night before, he did the same thing at the Champions In Action concert, at the Caymanas Polo Club.
(
Jamaican Observer 1) (Jamaican Observer 2) (OutRage!)

NOVEMBER 2004: Beenie Man released the song BADMAN NAH APOLOGIZE only appearing on DJ compilations. The song will be officially released on singles in February 2005. The lyrics can be found in the section Songs & Lyrics.

AUGUST 2004 (Philadelphia concert): Gay activists threatened to protest in front of the Electric Factory, but when the singer's management promised that he would not sing the homophobic songs the group agreed not to picket and the show went on. "This show almost got stopped," Beenie Man told the audience. "[Gays] got our music wrong," he said. "If you have sex with a man, that's your own business. We don't fight against lifestyles. We just don't want anyone to molest our kids." (www.365gay.com - August 8, 2004).
article

CHILD MOLESTING vs HOMOPHOBIC COMMENTS
On several occasions, Beenie Man has tried to minimized the impact of his homophobic speach when he felt his international career was in jeopardy, explaining (to who wants to believe) that his homophobic songs were in fact songs that attack child molesters instead of homosexuals. I found two examples: OCTOBER 12, 2004 (
US Concert): 'The artist, explained to the crowd at Toad's (New Haven, Connecticut) that his lyrics reject child molestation, a problem in his native Jamaica. Addressing the crowd, he said, "It is not like in America where you have a law protecting children. If you have sex with the kids, we have not justice for you." MARCH 21, 2005 (BBC News):"Jamaican people are taking our lyrics and translating them to people in the wrong way... a batty man is a child molester, anyone in Jamaica can tell you the same thing," OCTOBER 23, 2006 (PinkNews.co.uk): “I like to entertain, not hurt people. In Jamaica being gay isn't the same as in the UK.” The artist, who has previously been banned from award ceremonies and had concerts cancelled over his stance, attempted to justify lyrics such as, “I'm dreaming of a new Jamaica, come to execute all the gays." He said: "Batty man does not mean gay. A batty man is a man that like to have sex through the rear; he isn't gay. He could have a wife and kids, but just does that... it's also a word for the man that likes to indulge in kid prostitution, which is frowned upon, so of course we will speak out. Mr Man goes on to accuse Israel of being one of the world’s most homophobic countries, "Gay attacks happen everywhere, why blame it on Jamaican music? In Jerusalem if a person is gay, they can be taken to the middle of the road and cut up. But they say we are the most homophobic country in the world." A shocked Israeli Embassy spokesman told PinkNews.co.uk: “It is absolute rubbish.” He cited the recent WorldPride event in Jerusalem and upcoming gay pride march as examples of Israel’s more tolerant attitude to gay rights.

MARCH 23, 2007:
IMPORTANT DOCUMENT SIGNED
On March 23, 2007, Beenie Man signed the 'Reggae Compassionate Act', in order to be able to perform at the Italian Rototom Sunsplash Festival and other Europeen venues. This document is not an apology to the LGBT community, but can be seen as the artist is willing to put his homophobic past behind him. The document stating that the artist will no longer performed or write songs that discriminate gays and lesbians. It also states that he will not re-issue past materials that incite discrimination or hatered towards gays and lesbians. Peter Tatchell: "The Reggae Compassionate Statement’s rejection of racism, homophobia and sexism is an important milestone. We rejoice at its commitment to music without prejudice. We are delighted that the Reggae Compassionate Statement* has been signed by Beenie Man, Capleton
and Sizzla. Their disavowal of homophobia and other prejudices is a very welcome move. Although some artists did not stick to previous agreements, we accept that these three singers want to move on and put homophobia behind them. By signing the Reggae Compassionate Statement they are stating that, in future, they will not release new homophobic songs or authorise the re-release of previous homophobic songs. Moreover, they also agree that they will not make homophobic public statements.*In other words, they recognise that prejudice, hate and violence have no place in music – that singers should unite not divide, and uplift not put down, people of all races and sexualities. This agreement applies throughout the world – not just in Europe and the US, but also in Jamaica and the Caribbean". Rototom Sunsplash organiser: "We believe that these two letters are an extraordinary event. A great opportunity for all those who campaign for better reggae in a better world. We are conscious that they can retract everything, and of course we know that these documents will not make homophobic violence magically disappear from Jamaican society. Machismo, religious integralism and fanatism sink their roots in the island’s culture and society and will require many years to die out. But already the availability of two famous and important artistes to sign a clear and explicit document is, in our opinion, an extraordinary event: it is not only a great victory but also an opportunity of dialogue, that we cannot neglect."

NOTE: Like Peter Tatchell, I believe that artists that signed this contract should adopt a global attitude and shall act the same way in the Caribbean. I whish that the 'Reggae Compassionate Act' would clearly metioned this. Maybe a Reggae Compassionate Act II could be explicit on that level. Let's hope that the musicians that signed it are wise enough to respect it on a global scale.
(
picture of the Reggae Compassionate Act signed by Beenie Man) (OutRage! and Black Gay Men Advisory Group letter to Rototom Sunsplash) (letter from Rototom Sunsplash organiser)

JUNE 16 2007: “I never signed it (Reggae Compassionate Act), maybe the promoters signed it, because every promoter have to sign if dem want dem concert fi keep, but if yu nah sing about dem, there is no need to sign it,” Beenie told Xtratainment over the weekend.“A guy come fi my sign paper inna Spain and tell we say we must sign, and mi tell dem mi nah sing no song about them so mi nah sign it. Ah politics dem a deal wid, me know that, so dem caan trick me,” he said. Beenie Man insists that he signed no such document.“Maybe the promoters dem sign because dem want to promote dancehall in Europe and if dem have to sign so that the man dem ease up offa we, then that dem a go do. They know that is Jamaica we live and how we feel about that lifestyle, but it is about getting dancehall out there, and to the world,” Beenie Man said. “Why would I sign when I am going to continue to perform these songs I have? I know that if the vibes lick me, and me decide fi do a song, mi not going to be able to do it, because mi dun sign already so that is why me nah go sign. No compromise. My ting ah my ting. Me know about me. Mi already tell dem at dem big press conference in Spain, fi dem lifestyle ah fi dem lifestyle, and that is not wholesome to my lifestyle. Mi love woman, mi no love man, Jah,” he said. Beenie Man declared that he was no ‘sell-out’ “Mi caan sell out dancehall, ah that mi sing, straight,” Beenie Man said. “The gays dem no have no visa power, dem no have no police power, demo no have dem power de fi stop dancehall, dem caan get me fi sign nothing fi compromise my beliefs.” Peter Tatchell answer to these allegations was: "We are not sure whether this is a case of misreporting, spin by their management, or a genuine recantation," said Mr Tatchell. "What is absolutely certain is that these artists (Buju Banton and Beenie Man) have signed the Reggae Compassion Act, we have their signatures on the agreement. "The signatures have been authenticated as genuine. "Any attempt to deny that the artists have signed this agreement will just make them look dishonest, duplicitous and downright ridiculous." Mr Tatchell said that the deal had been brokered by reggae promoter Eddie Brown, of Pride Music, who knows the artists and flew to Jamaica to get their written agreement to the Act. "We have total confidence that Eddie Brown has got their signatures," Mr Tatchell said. "The insinuation that Mr Brown or anyone else forged the signatures is a mark of desperation, it reflects very badly on the character of the people making these allegations."
(
ClaudeMills.com) (One876Entertainment.com) (PinkNews.co.uk)

NOTE: Here we go again. Similar story as the one that occured in August 2004. Did Beenie Man really signed the Reggae Compassionate Act and later playing hypocrite while being interviewed to save ass infront of his Jamaican fanbased. Does Beenie Man says right and it would only be his manager that signed the deal... The Reggae Compassionate Act doesn't look like the usual contract, so Beenie Man cannot go away with the fact that he signed several paperwork without paying too much attention to what he signed.

NOVEMBER + DECEMBER 2007: "I'm not homophobic", the singer said in the Trinidad and Tobago media: "Trinidad Express". The same answer came a month later when he was interviewed by the Guyanese newspaper Kaieteur News Interviewed by Kaieteur News (Guyanese newspaper), Beenie Man says: What do you hold most close to your heart; social and personal issues?
"Everything... social wise is close to my heart because like AIDS is a killer. A lot of people die from AIDS and Cholera. Closer still are my kids. What they become in the future relies on what I do at present. I have to be a father to them from a child to when they grow up to be a man. People speak of other things I always speak of my kids. Some speak of AIDS. I don't have AIDS so I don't know what it is to have AIDS or how it feels. I pity the man and the woman that have AIDS which is no fault of theirs but more than go and have a little fun and then the fun turn out into a death sentence. That subject is very touchy topic. AIDS is not for you to scorn people regardless of who the person is whether them Homosexual, Heterosexual or straight or non straight. Regardless of who have it you have to pity the person. I don't speak of it and I don't speak of death, I speak only of life". Shaggy recently while visiting Guyana had said that too much time is waysted on Homophobia (having irrational hatered/fear of homosexuality) by artistes. What says you as a source of influence? "I have no phobia... I'm not homophobic... I cannot slew a gay man... a gay man is a gay man, he love man and I love woman... two different thing so for me there is no phobia"

SOURCE 1: Trinidad Express, November 7, 2007 (Section 2, page 5).
[taken from an open letter from Guyanese LGBT group SASOD, published in Stabroek News, on December 22, 2007]. SOURCE 2: Kaieteur News, January 4, 2008 (page 20).

MAY 14, 2012
See the section History & News of this website for the latest move made by Beenie Man







CAPLETON
DECEMBER 2002: Capleton has claimed that the fire in his song Bun Out Di Chi Chi is not really a physical fire. Is really a spiritual fire and a wordical fire, and a musical fire. But is people get it on the wrong term. People get confused. (Gay Times Magazine)

SEPTEMBER 12, 2004: Capleton issued an apology to San Franciso gays in an effort to head off a threatened demonstration. "I do not advocate violence or abuse against anyone, nor do I support prejudice, bigotry or discrimination," he said in a statement. "It bothers me deeply to hear that some of my past lyrics, which I no longer perform in concert, have been interpreted as offensive to gay and lesbian communities." Gay community leaders called it insufficient and too late. (365gay)
NOTE: I was unable to find the complete apology statement. The earliest article that quote it, is dated September 13, when his performance at San Francisco's Reggae In The Park, scheduled for October 3, was cancelled.

SEPTEMBER 24, 2004: Trying to solve the situation were several Capleton were being cancelled in California, West Hollywood Mayor John Duran wrote: “Capleton wanted to come out and say his music was about peace and love and that he denounced all kinds of violence,” he said. “We asked him to take the extra step to say that he denounced violence against gays and lesbians but ... he was not willing to go that far.”
(
LA Independent)

SEPTEMBER 30, 2004: In a telephone interview with The Santa Cruz Sentinel, Capleton defended himself by saying that his words are metaphorical, and the slang is being taken out of context. When he sings "You should know Capleton burns queers / the same fire applies to lesbians," the terms "burn" and "fire" should be understood to mean something "spiritual" not violent, he said. "It’s all about the purification of humanity. Preserve yourself, change from your evil ways," Capleton said. He added later, "It’s not a literal fire. This fire comes through words, salvation, redemption." He is not advocating violence against homosexuals but homosexuality is "against humanity. It's against your mother, it's against your father, it's against yourself." (
Santa Cruz Sentinel)

NOVEMBER 21, 2004: Capleton sing the song BUN OUT DI CHI CHI at the Caribbean Reggae Fest 2004 in Miami, a concert that clearly state "No Apology". (
Rootz Reggae & Kulcha).

JUNE 7, 2005: CAPLETON STATEMENT
GREETINGS IN THE NAME OF HIS IMPERIAL MAJESTY/ TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN/ Because of my religion, or spirituality, I have conviction about my own way of life and people have to respect that; but also because of this spirituality I know life is sacred and only Jah can give life and take it back, and this must be clear for the rest of the world my music is not inciting violence against any human being whatsoever, and from any way of life, whether home or abroad and it's a pity if some of my lyrics, which I already decided not to sing anyhow, has been taken personal and misunderstood or misinterpreted, in turn there should be no unpleasantries, racism or threat made toward me or my music./ Signed by Clifton Bailey a.k.a Capleton/ BLESS. (
Inter Centres LGBT)

JULY 31, 2005: CAPLETON INTERVIEW ON INTER-FRANCE (translated in French)
talking about the 12 concerts that were canceled on his 13-dates French tour. «Il s'agit d'une attaque contre notre musique, contre notre peuple. Vous comprenez, c'est du racisme. Ils ont envoyé plein de menaces de mort et de bassesses et d'insultes par internet. Or nous sommes tous libres de critiquer un style de vie qui ne convient pas à tous. Pour autant on n'encourage pas à aller tuer et à détruire d'autres gens. De toute façon, chacun est libre de choisir ses modes de vie». (
Tetu)

EARLY MAY, 2007: Capleton signed the 'Reggae Compassionate Act', in order to be able to perform at the Italian Rototom Sunsplash Festival and other Europeen venues. This document is not an apology to the LGBT community, but can be seen as the artist is willing to put his homophobic past behind him. The document stating that the artist will no longer performed or write songs that discriminate gays and lesbians. It also states that he will not re-issue past materials that incite discrimination or hatered towards gays and lesbians. Peter Tatchell: "The Reggae Compassionate Statement’s rejection of racism, homophobia and sexism is an important milestone. We rejoice at its commitment to music without prejudice. We are delighted that the Reggae Compassionate Statement* has been signed by Beenie Man, Capleton
and Sizzla. Their disavowal of homophobia and other prejudices is a very welcome move. Although some artists did not stick to previous agreements, we accept that these three singers want to move on and put homophobia behind them. By signing the Reggae Compassionate Statement they are stating that, in future, they will not release new homophobic songs or authorise the re-release of previous homophobic songs. Moreover, they also agree that they will not make homophobic public statements.*In other words, they recognise that prejudice, hate and violence have no place in music – that singers should unite not divide, and uplift not put down, people of all races and sexualities. This agreement applies throughout the world – not just in Europe and the US, but also in Jamaica and the Caribbean". Rototom Sunsplash organiser: "We believe that these two letters are an extraordinary event. A great opportunity for all those who campaign for better reggae in a better world. We are conscious that they can retract everything, and of course we know that these documents will not make homophobic violence magically disappear from Jamaican society. Machismo, religious integralism and fanatism sink their roots in the island’s culture and society and will require many years to die out. But already the availability of two famous and important artistes to sign a clear and explicit document is, in our opinion, an extraordinary event: it is not only a great victory but also an opportunity of dialogue, that we cannot neglect."
(
picture of the Reggae Compassionate Act signed by Capleton)

DECEMBER 25, 2007: CAPLETON BREAKS HIS SIGNATURE OF THE REGGAE COMPASSIONATE ACT
While performing at Magnum GT Taylor Christmas Extravaganza (Black River, Jamaica), Capleton sang the homophobic song 'Fire Time' and promoted violence agaisnt gays and lesbians with sentences like 'Battyman fi dead di yuth em right bout that'. By doing so, he breakes his signature of the Reggae Compassionate Act, an official document that he signed in May 2007 in order to move on with his violent homophobic past and be able to tour in Europe. By promoting violence towards gays and lesbians onsatge in Jamaica, the artist proves that his signature of the RCA was a fluke and was done strictly for financial purpose. Video Proofs were found on YouTube by Stop Murder Music Bern in October 2008. (see the section NEWS & HISTORY, on October 28, 2008 for more details)
(
YouTube – clip of the concert) (Transcript Of The YouTube segment)




SIZZLA
APRIL 2002: At a reggae concert in Chicago on 12 April 2002, Sizzla bragged that he kills queers, and he also incited the audience to murder gays and lesbians: "Look in the bible where christ tells you to live clean", he began. "but none of you could be here tonight if daddy wasn't with mommy", he finished, as explanation for the sexual slackness in his recent lyrics. he then went into a firey tune;" mi nuh go tek back mi chat... mi kill sodomite and batty man" and then more explanation for his hatred of homosexuals, "dem bring aids and disease pon people" and then more djing lyrics "shot a kill dem, mi nuh go tek back mi chat". (I wont take back my words…I kill sodomites and queers, they bring AIDS and disease upon people…shoot and kill them, I won't take back my words.) (story) (click on to archive)

AUGUST 2004: "We won't tolerate homosexuals, we won't tolerate lesbians," says Sizzla, who will headline a concert in Montreal next week, over the phone. "Lesbians and faggots, how did they came? They came through man and woman, mother and father, the guardians of life. The artists won't stop [singing anti-gay lyrics] because the people won't stop, because [anti-gay sentiment] is a tradition. We must keep the covenant of the most [high] and give thanks and praise.""It is wrong! Once we stoop to sodomites and homosexuals, it is wrong!" Sizzla says, his voice rising. "Wherever I go it is the same thing - burn sodomite, burn battyman. Burn all things that are wrong. Burn it... We must get rid of Sodom and Gomorrah right now and they must give us [the African diaspora] repatriation [to Africa] right now." Then, just before hanging up the phone, Sizzla calmly says, "Much love to the people. As you know, Jah is love."
(Hour Magazine - August 19, 2004 - interview by Richard Burnett) (
article)

NOVEMBER 25, 2004: NO APOLOGY FROM ANTI-GAY SINGER. Reggae star Sizzla has refused to apologise for his lyrics advocating violence against gay men, despite his UK tour being cancelled after protests."They can't ask me to apologise," he told BBC radio station 1Xtra. "They've got to apologise to God because they break God's law." Sizzla is not allowed into the UK while the Home Secretary examines concerns raised by gay rights group OutRage! But the singer said: "We don't go there to hurt people."Born in Jamaica as Miguel Collins, Sizzla has released 25 albums since 1995 and is credited with taking dancehall music back to its reggae origins. One of his most controversial songs, Pump Up, contains the Jamaican patois lyrics "fire fi di man dem weh go ride man behind", translated by OutRage! as "burn the men who have sex with men". His five-date UK tour was cancelled earlier this month as the Metropolitan Police's Racial and Violent Crime unit examined lyrics by eight reggae artists. In his first interview since the cancellation, Sizzla explained why he would not apologise to homosexuals."Why must I apologise to corruption? How can I do that?" he said. But the singer denied he was a threat to gay men and lesbians."I sing 'fire burn for homosexuals' and sometime in some street I walk, I see them and me no touch them," he said. "If I don't like what you're doing I don't come there, if you don't like what I'm doing or what I say you don't come where I'm at." He concluded: "Everyone's entitled to life, freedom of security and person."
(
BBC News)

JUNE 10, 2005: OFFICIAL SIZZLA STATEMENT: To whom it may concern I have been invited to Europe by many organisations in order to perform at various venues. I have agreed to do this gladly without any animosity towards anyone or any organisation. I am an artist whose art as transcended boundaries and thus afforded me the opportunity to express my thoughts globally. I know that in the past some of my material may have seemed to incite violence towards others which was never my intention. However, I will not perform these materials on stage so as not to offend anyone anywhere. I will however reserve the right as a citizen of earth to express my art in any way I see fit and to say what I feel; this is the right of a free man afforded to me by the almighty. I do however understand that words and music are powerful tools and as such one should be careful in its use. I wish you all Peace Love and Unity. Jah Bless. Miguel Collins A.K.A SIZZLA" (
Inter Centres LGBT)

APRIL 15, 2007: Sizzla signed the 'Reggae Compassionate Act', in order to be able to perform at the Italian Rototom Sunsplash Festival and other Europeen venues. This document is not an apology to the LGBT community, but can be seen as the artist is willing to put his homophobic past behind him. The document stating that the artist will no longer performed or write songs that discriminate gays and lesbians. It also states that he will not re-issue past materials that incite discrimination or hatered towards gays and lesbians. Peter Tatchell: "The Reggae Compassionate Statement’s rejection of racism, homophobia and sexism is an important milestone. We rejoice at its commitment to music without prejudice. We are delighted that the Reggae Compassionate Statement* has been signed by Beenie Man, Capleton
and Sizzla. Their disavowal of homophobia and other prejudices is a very welcome move. Although some artists did not stick to previous agreements, we accept that these three singers want to move on and put homophobia behind them. By signing the Reggae Compassionate Statement they are stating that, in future, they will not release new homophobic songs or authorise the re-release of previous homophobic songs. Moreover, they also agree that they will not make homophobic public statements.*In other words, they recognise that prejudice, hate and violence have no place in music – that singers should unite not divide, and uplift not put down, people of all races and sexualities. This agreement applies throughout the world – not just in Europe and the US, but also in Jamaica and the Caribbean". Rototom Sunsplash organiser: "We believe that these two letters are an extraordinary event. A great opportunity for all those who campaign for better reggae in a better world. We are conscious that they can retract everything, and of course we know that these documents will not make homophobic violence magically disappear from Jamaican society. Machismo, religious integralism and fanatism sink their roots in the island’s culture and society and will require many years to die out. But already the availability of two famous and important artistes to sign a clear and explicit document is, in our opinion, an extraordinary event: it is not only a great victory but also an opportunity of dialogue, that we cannot neglect."
(
picture of the Reggae Compassionate Act signed by Sizzla) (OutRage! and Black Gay Men Advisory Group letter to Rototom Sunsplash) (letter from Rototom Sunsplash organiser)

JUNE 13, 2007: Not even two months after signing the 'Reggae Compassionate Act', Sizzla proves that he has no intention of respecting his signature. On June 13, during his concert in Berlin, Sizzla performed the song 'Nah Apologize', his 'I will never apology to no battyman' anthem. While it was time to sing the chorus, he made a sing-along with the crowd, avoiding ironiaclly the use of the word 'battyman', leaving the crowd singing it for him. Other source says that he also performed the same sing-along in Paris on June 17, in Milan on June 20, in Bari-Modugno on June 22, at the Summerjam in Cologne on July 7, in Belgium on July 12. A similar sing-along seems to have occured in Zurich, on June 30, but the song was censored this time. According to the french website Reggealution, the setlist of his performance at L'Elysee Montmartre on June 17, 2007, Sizzla also performed the homophobic songs: 'To The Point', in which features the sentence (at least in the studio version of the song): 'sodomite and battybwoy mi seh a death fi dem' (lesbians and gays, I say death to them). This information would need to be validated, considering the fact that the law is quite strict in France for people found guilty of hatred provocation, violence or discrimination based on sexual orientation: one year of prison or a 45,000 Euro fine.
(
FORUM: Compilation Statements) (ARTICLE: Sound System) (LYRICS: Nah Apologize) (Reggaelution.net) (LYRICS: To The Point)

MARCH 23, 2012: To Whom It May Concern, We work closely with many of the artists in the reggae scene and feel that your constant attack against the artists and the musical genre is unfair and one sided. Sizzla has not even begun to tour, yet press releases have been sent giving misinformation to the public about him performing homophobic lyrics at 18 other shows recently. The tour has not even started and Sizzla was not booked to perform in neither Canada nor England. False information is being written to malice and defame his character. It is good to remember that Sizzla has not been arrested, convicted, or charged with any crime and does not have a criminal record what so ever. He abides and will continue to abide by the laws of any State in the World that he chooses to visit or is invited to visit. It is his nature and his character to respect all. Sizzla and all human beings are entitled to freedom of speech, freedom of expression, and artistic freedom as afforded to him by the United Nations Human Rights Council. With these rights he does not seek to incite or provoke violence against anyone, but will continue to speak out against injustices where he sees it. ......It is very important for you to understand something. The term batty boy was derived from the rise of pedophiles and rape of young boys in Jamaica. That is why the term batty boy is used, so those that embrace this term, therefore embrace the raping and pedophile of young boys. This is one of the main reasons why there is such an outcry against homosexuality because in many cases in Jamaica it has been done where young boys were raped or coerced by tourist into the lifestyle seeking to gain visa or better opportunities. This has also contributed to a rise in gay male prostitution in Jamaica and is prevalent amongst teenagers and youth of Jamaica. (The complete statement is below)
PERSONNAL COMMENT: there is a lot of things that are false in this statement, starting with the meaning of 'batty man'. For more information about this statement, visit the HISTORY & NEWS section of this website, and look under March 19, 2012.
(
Sizzla Official Statement)






BUJU BANTON
DECEMBER 1992: talking about the song Boom Bye Bye:“Homosexuality runs contrary to my religious beliefs’ but he actually apologised, saying he did not mean to incite violence against any communities". But then there was a film of him in Jamaica, performing the song with a gang of guys carrying sticks.
Note: the film the article refers to was probably an extract from the ducumentary Darker Side Of Black, shown on The World.
(extract from Channel Four's youth series: The World, transcripted in the article
Murder in the Dancehall (Gay Times Magazine, December 2002)

Buju Banton's PR agents are falsely claiming he has apologised for these murderous lyrics. It is true that his record company put out an ‘apology’ some years ago, but Banton immediately denied apologising and even attacked his own record company for doing so. If he is sorry, why is Banton still performing Boom Bye Bye, re-releasing it, and making money out of it? (source)

OCTOBER 1999: Buju Banton, who told me himself a few years ago when I asked him about his 1991 hit Boom Bye Bye, a song that advocates killing “Batty boys”, or homosexuals, “Boom Bye Bye means judgement, do you understand? If I am 20, or when I'm older [reporters will still] ask me this question and the sentiments of this song [will] still remain the same. Nothing don't change because my feelings about family don't change. And the song has a [good] message.” (Fugues - Interview by Richard Burnett, September 20, 2001) (article)

MAY 2000: An interview, published in New Nation (a newspaper serving members of the black community), includes a reiteration by Banton of his homophobic views and a denial that he had ever recanted or changed these views.
(New Nation - May 29, 2000) • NOTE: I was unable to locate the article on the internet to bring Buju Banton's comment.

AUGUST 2004: OFFICIAL BUJU BANTON STATEMENT (found on a forum, dated September 7, 2004)
Again it has been brought to my attention that I , Mark Myrie, AKA Buju Banton, has been accused of inciting murder and violence against those that have different beliefs to that of my own. I would like to put it on record that I have never attacked anyone of any persuasion different to that of my own, nor do I seek to attack them. Like any normal film-maker who puts violence in his films, I do not expect actions in my lyrics to be carried out literally by the public. I personally, my music and lyrics do not intend to instigate or incite anyone to do so, as I do not believe in the murder or the killing of the innocent just because they are different in any way. The “Boom Bye Bye” recording using certain lyrics I understand, causes offence to some people in the community. This recording was made 12 years ago and this song is not performed on my live shows and will not be performed. I do however as an artist retain the right in a democratic society to express my art in any way I see fit. I will like any free man respect the right to life, freedom of expression, and liberty for all and I will fight for that right. With regards to the allegation that I allegedly assaulted 3 gay men in Jamaica, isn’t one innocent until proven otherwise in a duly constituted court of law in my homeland of Jamaica? I find it ironic that an organization that is fighting for justice and equality is at the same time acting as judge, jury and pre-empting the due course of law. As a Rasta artist who has contributed so much positive music to the world, which has resulted in being nominated twice for the prestigious Grammy Awards, whose album “Til Shiloh” was voted one of the best albums of the century by “Rolling Stone” magazine, it is a grave injustice to try and define my career with one song “Boom Bye Bye” done 12 years ago at the age of 18 years old. Mark Myrie, AKA Buju Banton (
source)

AUGUST 2004: Buju Banton still perform the song 'Boom Bye Bye'. He performed it as recent as August 8, 2004, at the Smirnoff 96 festival in Negril Jamaica. (source)

APRIL 2006: According to Outrage! Buju played 'Boom Bye Bye' at a concert in Jamaica as recently as last year (2005) and refused to apologise for the lyrics in a recent BBC1Extra interview in April this year. BBC radio station, 1Xtra, was criticised last April after interviewing Banton. The song 'Boom Bye Bye', which featured in the broadcast, says, "The world is in trouble, anytime Buju Banton come batty boy get up and run, ah gunshot in ah head man Tell dem crew… it’s like Boom bye bye, in a batty boy head, rude boy nah promote no nasty man, them hafi dead". Five people complained about the BBC station using the anti gay star, real name Mark Myrie, after gay group Outrage issued a statement condemning the show. A BBC 1Xtra spokeswoman said an excerpt from the song was used to give context to the controversy in Banton’s career, the presenter said on the show "'Boom Bye Bye' was massive in reggae circles and there was a massive disruption... In 1991 Buju recorded 'Boom bye bye', the track caused outrage,” and then the excerpt was played. (
Rainbow Network)

JUNE 2006: Buju Banton is offered another chance to apologise before his concert was cancelled, in one of Britain's most gay-friendly communities.
Simon Williams (Brighton Green city Councillor): "A performance by him in such a gay friendly city as Brighton and Hove would be inappropriate and damage community relations. This is not about censoring genuine creativity, but no artist with any humanity would want to sing these words. His words incite the shooting and murder of people because of their sexuality and he continues to sing them. "He will not retract them or express any personal apology. His lyrics create an environment where homophobia and hatred is given cultural approval and if he had sung these songs and referred to black people in place of gay people he would rightly be arrested for incitement to hatred." Mr Williams added: "There’s a popular misconception that he’s apologised for this song which was written in the early 1990s. This is not true. There's been no apology from Buju - only a reluctant apology issued by the record company which he has since disavowed while he continues to promote and perform this song." According to Outrage! Buju played ‘Boom Bye Bye’ at a concert in Jamaica as recently as last year and refused to apologise for the lyrics in a recent BBC1Extra interview in April this year. (
PinkNews.co.uk) (Rainbow Network)
NOTE: This concert was the only one cancelled from his 25-concert Europeen Tour in June/July 2006.

JULY 23, 2007: Buju Banton signed the 'Reggae Compassionate Act', in order to be able to perform at the Italian Rototom Sunsplash Festival and other Europeen venues. This document is not an apology to the LGBT community, but can be seen as the artist is willing to put his homophobic past behind him. The document stating that the artist will no longer performed or write songs that discriminate gays and lesbians. It also states that he will not re-issue past materials that incite discrimination or hatered towards gays and lesbians. Peter Tatchell: "The Reggae Compassionate Statement’s rejection of racism, homophobia and sexism is an important milestone. We rejoice at its commitment to music without prejudice. We are delighted that the Reggae Compassionate Statement* has been signed by Beenie Man, Capleton
and Sizzla. Their disavowal of homophobia and other prejudices is a very welcome move. Although some artists did not stick to previous agreements, we accept that these three singers want to move on and put homophobia behind them. By signing the Reggae Compassionate Statement they are stating that, in future, they will not release new homophobic songs or authorise the re-release of previous homophobic songs. Moreover, they also agree that they will not make homophobic public statements.*In other words, they recognise that prejudice, hate and violence have no place in music – that singers should unite not divide, and uplift not put down, people of all races and sexualities. This agreement applies throughout the world – not just in Europe and the US, but also in Jamaica and the Caribbean". Rototom Sunsplash organiser: "We believe that these two letters are an extraordinary event. A great opportunity for all those who campaign for better reggae in a better world. We are conscious that they can retract everything, and of course we know that these documents will not make homophobic violence magically disappear from Jamaican society. Machismo, religious integralism and fanatism sink their roots in the island’s culture and society and will require many years to die out. But already the availability of two famous and important artistes to sign a clear and explicit document is, in our opinion, an extraordinary event: it is not only a great victory but also an opportunity of dialogue, that we cannot neglect."The very same day that Peter Tachell and The Guardian newspaper announced that Buju Banton had signed the Reggae Compassionate Act, RadioJamaica.com was publishing on their website that Banton's manager was denying the news: "speaking with RJR news, Buju's manager Donovan Germaine dismissed the report out of hand. He added that the management team would not comment further on the issue as it was being used by the gay rights group to gain mileage for their cause". Peter Tatchell answer to these allegations was: "We are not sure whether this is a case of misreporting, spin by their management, or a genuine recantation," said Mr Tatchell. "What is absolutely certain is that these artists (Buju Banton and Beenie Man) have signed the Reggae Compassion Act, we have their signatures on the agreement. "The signatures have been authenticated as genuine. "Any attempt to deny that the artists have signed this agreement will just make them look dishonest, duplicitous and downright ridiculous." Mr Tatchell said that the deal had been brokered by reggae promoter Eddie Brown, of Pride Music, who knows the artists and flew to Jamaica to get their written agreement to the Act. "We have total confidence that Eddie Brown has got their signatures," Mr Tatchell said. "The insinuation that Mr Brown or anyone else forged the signatures is a mark of desperation, it reflects very badly on the character of the people making these allegations."
(
picture of the Reggae Compassionate Act signed by Buju Banton) (The Guardian) (Peter Tatchell) (GayCityNews) (RadioJamaica.com) (PinkNews.co.uk)

OCTOBER 27, 2007: BUNJU BANTON BROKE HIS SIGNATURE OF THE RCA
Three months after signing the Reggae Compassionate Act, Buju Banton showed that he had no intention to put his homophobic past behind him. The Guyanese newspaper Stabroek writes: 'But the night certainly belonged to the dreadlocked, still very much homophobic Jamaican dancehall star, who had no apologies for his discriminatory lyrics lashing the gay community. "Buju nah like no batty boy and dem batty boy attack Buju", the singer said to an adulating audience who seemed to have been waiting for that exact moment. And perhaps feeling the vibes of the embracing crowd and the urge to sing his controversial song, 'Boom Bye Bye', the singer belted out a few of the lyrics nearing the close of his performance. But Buju was not the only performer to have walked that line. When Peter Tatchell was interviewed by UK Newspaper The Voice, "We offered Buju Banton a deal. We agreed to call off our campaign if he agreed to stop performing songs advocating killing gay people. Buju has now broken this agreement so we will be consulting with our human rights allies in Jamaica and throughout the Caribbean. I suspect they will want to resume the campaign. Most black and gay and human rights groups will now insist there is a world wide boycott of him."
(
Stabroek News 1) (The Voice)



ELEPHANT MAN
Elephant Man statement: “We (Jamaicans) know that this thing is not right and we are not going to uphold it. The Jamaican heritage is deep, we love God and we are not involve in certain things. From the time I was growing up, I learned that chi-chi man fi get bun. Until we dead pon earth, the fire nah come off dem. A just straight fire a bun dem out” (JohannHari.com)

In January 2004, Alona Wartofsky write: One can imagine discussions between Atlantic and VP executives and Elephant Man about leaving homophobic lyrics off "Good 2 Go," but Elephant Man plays down the whole issue. "When I go in the studio, I don't go in the studio to talk about those type of things," he says. "I go into the studio to make hit records for the fans, and for people to buy and for people to love. I don't go in the studio thinking about that guy living his life that way and to curse him out or to pass judgment on nobody. It's your life. Do what you want to do. We all have to answer to God one day, so live your life how you want to live it."(
CribUpdate.com)

LATE 2005 OR EARLY 2006: Elephant Man issue a note of saying that it wasn't his intention to incite violence. He was probably forced to sign such a document in order to be able to performed in North America and Europe after the Stop Murder Music campaign has got the media attention. The date is unknown, but it might have been prior to Elephant Man's Europeen Tour in December 2005 or his North American tour in early 2006. (
Elephant Man statement)

JULY 2006: Blabbeando comment the Riddim magazine interview with Elephant Man on his blog: 'Of the 2004 protests against "murder music" he is less forthcoming and, while there are no appologies, he does seem to indicate some sort of truce brought upon by the demands of being on a major music label: "I know why all that happen, but now we put it aside. We don't talk about them. We just do music, we happy, they happy. Nobody wanna go back to being a problem to nobody. Everyone's just taking it easy and being cool. If you'e on a major label, you can't think of saying those kind of things." (Riddim magazine No.4 (english edition), July 2006) (
blabbeando.blogspot.com)

OCTOBER 2, 2007: Facing several protest and very bad newspaper coverage during his Canadian Tour, Elephant Man finally agreed to signed the Reggae Compassionate Act, but the press conference was cancelled at the last minute as the canadian coalition for the Stop Murder Music campaign refused acnowkledge the signature if it wasn't done in Jamaica. This new rule for the RCA appears after Beenie Man and Buju Banton, both signataries of the act having publicly denied their signatures. Now the three organisations resposible for the Stop Murder Music campaign, OutRage! (UK), J-FLAG (Jamaica) and Black Gay Men Advisory Group (UK), request that the signature for the Reggae Compassionate Act needs to be done on Jamaican soil, with a press conference where the artist targeted by the campaign must denounce homophobic violence. The press conference for Elephant Man signing the act was initially organised by the Carlton University Students' Association (CUSA) and would have take place on the university campus on October 3rd. The association was responsible for bringing Elephant Man at Ottawa's Kool Haus on October 4th. The show and the press conference were cancelled on October 2nd. According to Akim Larcher, spokesman for the Stop Murder Music campaign in Canada, signing the act outside of Elephant Man’s homeland, Jamaica would “not be worth the paper it’s signed on.”“It has to be [signed] in a Jamaican context,” he said. Larcher said that in the past, other artists, such as Beenie Man, signed the Reggae Compassionate Act outside of Jamaica only to later claim their signatures were forged. He said he believes Elephant Man would do the same thing, even if he signed the document publicly. Shelley Melanson, CUSA president said she disagreed. “We were planning to have all major media sources [at the press conference],” she said, and added there would be no way for Elephant Man to deny it afterwards. “He wanted to do this,” said Maynes. Larcher said he also felt CUSA rushed its decision to have the artist sign the act, and were not within their right to do so, as they did not contact members of the GLBT community of Jamaica. Maynes fired back. “They say it has to be signed in a Jamaican context, but what about a Caribbean context, and the rest of the world?” he said. An chance to combat homophobia, said Maynes, has now been wasted. “To have someone come out and actually say that being homophobic is wrong would have been a great opportunity,” he said. But the SMM remained steadfast in its stance. (
The Charlatan) (Xtra)

NOVEMBER 22, 2007: Elephant Man signs the Reggae Compassionate Act. It was never publicised. There is no date on the document. Four months later, he promote violence in the videoclip 'Our World'.

NOTE: I only learned about the signature of this document 23 months later. The video for the song '
Our World', released in late March 2008 clearly states that he has no intentions to not respect the RCA. There might even be other examples that he didn not respect his signature. Look under November 22, 2007, in the HISTORY & NEWS section of this website for more details on the signature.





VYBZ KARTEL
SEPTEMBER 5, 2004: VYBZ KARTEL BOWS TO GAY PRESSURE: Controversial dancehall DJ VYBZ KARTEL has succumbed to the intense pressure himself and other dancehall acts have been experiencing from the international gay community. KARTEL and fellow dancehall artistes have been feeling a serious dent in their pockets as the gays wage an all out war against them for their violent homophobic lyrics, forcing their removal from numerous international events. In an interview with the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) earlier this week, VYBZ KARTEL said he apologised for his lyrics. He stated that his homophobic days were behind him and he was now preaching a message of tolerance. "THAT'S WHAT WE ARE DOING, NOT JUST ME VYBZ KARTEL ALONE, BUT ALL THE ARTISTS, WE ARE TAKING THAT STANCE. WE WANT TO MOVE ON NOW"; he said. KARTEL's apology comes on the heels billed for the big UK reggae festival, Reggae In The Park, scheduled for Sunday, September 5, following intense lobbying by the gay rights group OutRage!. The concert was to have featured BARRINGTON LEVY, GREGORY ISAACS, MARCIA GRIFFITS, SIZZLA and VYBZ KARTEL.
NOTE: I was unable to find the article, but it was published before September 6. The following link seems to be a transcrip from the original: (
O.J.36Records.com)

NOVEMBER 21, 2004: The Caribbean Reggae Fest 2004 in Miami, a concert that clearly state "No Apology"...Vybz Kartel who came on stage after the Fifth Element Crew of Richie Spice, Chuck Fender and Anthony Cruz had warmed up the crowd, was the first artist to state overtly to the audience, "No Apology" as he made his way onto the stage. And if people were still wondering what he was talking about, a few minutes into his set it became very evident, as he constantly commented that he didn't support certain lifestyles. (
Rootz Reggae & Kulcha)

FEBRUARY 2005: Vybz Kartel and Beenie Man record the song BATTY BWOY FI DEAD on the Nookie riddim. Only available on DJ compilations, it was never officially released. Prior to that, both artists have recorded songs (seperately), in defiance of the OutRage! 'Stop Murder Music' campaign. Tha info was found in a December 2004 article. I wonder which songs they are refering to.

SEPTEMBER 22, 2010: Vybz Kartel will be performing in Paris on September 26. Local groups put pressure because of his violent homophobic songs. Vybz Kartel agreed to no longer perform these songs by singing the Reggae Compassionate Act. The French section of the international Stop Murder Music campaign received a copy of the RCA signed by Vybz Kartel. It was sent from his personal email address at 7:03 pm (Kingston time) on Wednesday Sepetember 22nd. Press Release: "Tjenbé Rèd welcomes this courageous gesture by Vybz Kartel and thanks the council of the 18th district of Paris, which, on the intiative of Mr Ian Brossat (chair of the group of communist and Left Party elected representatives on Paris city council, counsellor for the 18th district), had voted for a formal request to be sent to the capital's Prefect of Police asking him "to consider the risks to public order which might be provoked by" the singer's concert in this district on the coming Sunday. Tjenbé Rèd consequently withdraws all calls for organised action in relation to this concert (and asked the Prefect of Police to allow this concert to happen). Vigilance is still required. Several performers of murder music have signed the RCA, then denied having signed it..." (more on the link below)
(
Tjembé Rèd Press Release) (copy of the RCA signed by Vybz Kartel) (Jamaica Gleaner: Statement from J-FLAG)







BOUNTY KILLER
Over the years, the singer never issued any apologies (at least, I haven't found any information about the existance of such). However, he seems to be walking away from the conflict by changing his ways of acting. See the section HISTORY & NEWS of this website under May 22, 2012 to read his statement.

MAY 26, 2012: Regarding the video 'apology" made by Beenie Man in May 2012. "Me can't ever put a dollar over Jamaica and its culture. If it wasn't for dancehall and its culture I don't know where or who I'd be today. Mi nuh sorry fi nothing that I said or sang; I am sorry to know it offended anybody but that's how I see it. My views and beliefs, all I can say is that homosexuals fi stop try ban we shows and dancehall must leave dem alone to God still and let peace reign," he said. (
OutARoad)May 22, 2012

 

 

SHABBA RANKS
DECEMBER 1992: in an interview on Channel Four's youth series The World, Shabba Ranks supported Buju Banton's song Boom Bye Bye by saying: “God created Adam and Eve, not Adam and Steve. If you break the law of God you deserve crucifixtion”. There was uproar in the audience. Mark Lamarr jumped on Ranks and told him “Thats absolute crap and you know it!”...Due to the power and influence of the gay lobby in the music business, in the wake of his statement, Ranks was dropped from a scheduled performance on the "Tonight Show With Jay Leno," and many of Shabba's live shows were accompanied by protests, just because of his support for "Boom Bye Bye". Under pressure, he later said that while homosexuality was wrong, he did not condone physical violence against anyone.

NOTE: as internet was not widely used in 1992/1993, very few information have been found regarding Shabba Ranks. The upper information is a collage from three different sources (Murder in the Dancehall) (The Great Chi Chi Man Debate) (Examining Gay Issues in Racial Settings)

Protecting Buju Banton, Shabba Ranks said in an interview: "In Jamaica, if a homosexual is being found in the community, we stone him to death" (Details Magazine, 1993)

DECEMBER 2004: There is a widespread belief in Kingston that when the argument about dancehall homophobia first erupted in the early 1990s, Shabba Ranks, then the biggest star in reggae, made conciliatory overtures to pro-gay pressure groups and thus ended his career overnight.
(The Guardian - December 10, 2004) (
article)





T.O.K.
when I asked T.O.K. frontman Roshaun Clarke if the song Chi Chi Man is anti-gay, he fumes, “Ummm, no. We’ve moved on from there. There’s more to us than Chi Chi Man.” (Hour - Interview by Richard Burnett, August 23, 2004)

DECEMBER 2005: T.O.K. performed the song 'Chi Chi Man' at the Smirnoff Experience in Jamaica, on December 23, 2005. (
Jamaica Observer)

JUNE 2007: THE REGGAE COMPASSIONATE ACT:
International dancehall group T.O.K says they are by no means compassionate towards such an Act either, as they feel it is not representative of them and have therefore come up with their own contract. Craig T says, "while we do agree with some of the statements made in the Reggae Compassionate Act, it is not a hundred per cent representative of the group (TOK) and we refuse to put our signature to anything we will not abide by," he said. Members of T.O.K say they feel they were being forced into something. Bay C says, "I never like the fact that they were already attacking us about it even before we signed or knew about it. Is like they were trying to pressure us into signing an wi nuh compassionate." However, Craig T says, it's not that they are rejecting the Act, "I wouldn't say reject, but revise." A section of T.O.K's revised Act reads, 'It is the view of T.O.K, and we are confident that several members of the reggae community and the worldwide musical community would agree, that in addition to the many positive beliefs outlined in the document to which we subscribe, the right to freedom of speech and artistic expression is of equal importance and should not be marginalized.' It continued, 'T.O.K therefore sees the 'Reggae Compassionate Act' not as a definitive document on these issues, but as a doorway to greater dialogue, where all points of view on the issues raised therein can be heard and respected without the fear of sanction'
(
Jamaica Star)

AUGUST 13, 2009:
TOK signed a document similar to the Reggae Compassionate Act. on August 13, 2009 before ther perfomance in Zurich. MORE TO COME.  
(
Reggae Compassionate Act signed by T.O.K.)








SPRAGGA BENZ
Spragga Benz two weeks ago issued a statement condemning gays and [emphasized] that his anti-gay message will continue to go out.
(www.jahworks.org - Spring 2002 - Interview by Gregory Stephens)





NO APOLOGY (By Michael Barnett) - CARIBBEAN REGGAE FEST 2004 (Miami, Bicentennial Park, November 21, 2004)
NO APOLOGY! was definitely the reverberating theme of the night for the Caribbean Reggae Fest 2004, which featured artists like Beenie Man, Bounty Killer, Capleton, Sizzla, Vybz Kartel, Spragga Benz, Lady Saw, Richie Spice, Chuck Fender, I-Wayne, Tanto-Metro and Devonte, Baby Cham, Assassin and too many more to mention. Just a few days before the day the show was to be held at Bicentennial Park on Sunday, November 21, it became known to many members of the press that some of the South Florida Gay Community were making concerted efforts to shut the show down. Of significance here is the fact that almost all of the main Dancehall Reggae artists who had been targeted by gay activists recently, particularly by the group Outrage hailing from England, were on the bill for the Caribbean Reggae Fest 2004, the key notable exception being T.O.K.

However, despite some agitation from the South Florida gay community, the venue, Bicentennial Park, and by implication the City of Miami, did not pull out of the show, giving the very ambitious Jamaican promoters the opportunity they desired to put on a Reggae-Dancehall show with a distinctly Jamaican flavor. There was supposed to be a major demonstration mounted by the South Florida gay populace in front of the venue, in public protest of the line up of the show, but when the day of the show arrived only a few demonstrators were reportedly spotted and they did nothing particularly newsworthy. When the show got underway, many of the artists it seemed wasted no time before venting their feelings regarding the ongoing gay onslaught against Reggae Dance-hall music. Vybz Kartel who came on stage after the Fifth Element Crew of Richie Spice, Chuck Fender and Anthony Cruz had warmed up the crowd, was the first artist to state overtly to the audience, "No Apology" as he made his way onto the stage. And if people were still wondering what he was talking about, a few minutes into his set it became very evident, as he constantly commented that he didn't support certain lifestyles.

A little after Vybz Kartel left the stage, Bounty Killer came on stage with a vengeance. "No Apology" were the first words to be uttered from Bounty's lips. After stating this, Bounty started to chase off his detractors even more aggressively than had Vibez Kartel. But probably the most interesting thing to develop for this writer was when Capleton bounced onto the stage immediately after Bounty Killer's departure, and went straight into his now famous lyrical repertoire of "Bun Out The Chi Chi." Apparently Capleton had agreed prior to many of his recent shows, not to perform any of his songs that might be construed as homophobic. However, it was clear to see that Capleton felt under no such restrictions on this show. After "bu'ning much fire pon de Chi-Chi Man," Capleton proceeded to explain that the fire he was bu'ning was not to be taken literally, in the sense that he was not advocating the literal burning of anybody, but rather a purification, or a purging. He said he meant "fire" in the context of purifying something, or purging it of its bad properties. (NOTE: the song also state "blood out di chi chi", among other violent content).

Sizzla who came on stage immediately after Capleton was another artist who notably started his set by stating: "No Apology", and he too then proceeded to lick out verbally against gay lifestyles. It became unavoidably clear and apparent that the gay backlash against Jamaican music was foremost on the minds of many of the Dancehall artists that performed that night, and the overwhelming response from them was "No Apology!" (http://www.rootzreggae.com/Rootz-view/NoApology.htm)





'NO APOLOGY' T-SHIRTS
The “no apology” stance has become something of a mantra in the ranks of dancehall’s hardcore following, with T-shirts now proclaiming the words as a stalwart defense of the artists and their license for inflammatory rhetoric. “No apology” T-shirts could be spotted being worn and sold at booths at the West Indian American Labor Day Carnival in Brooklyn on September 6, the city’s largest outdoor gathering attended by an estimated 2 million revelers, most of Caribbean origin. (Nicolas Boston / www.gaycitynews.com/gcn_337/fridayprotest.html)





Fussin' & fightin' between Beenie Man and Bounty Killer
BOUNTY KILLER (on Beenie Man and the No Doubt video)
Note: Bounty Killer wrote the song Look Good, as an answer to Beenie Man's allegation that he is gay for being performing in the No Doubt video'Hey Baby', in which a poorly-timed edit shows a naked male member of the band cavorting as Bounty Killer chats about how he likes the way you shake it, etc. No doubt that No Doubt was aware neither of the implications nor the hyper-machismo and hyper-homophobia inherent in Jamaican culture. (www.reggae-reviews.com)

Beenie Man and me have feud from a long time and back in the days him used to sound like me and deejay bad man lyrics, but then him change and say him is the girls dem sugar and start deejay fi di girls dem. Bad man no like Beenie Man, Beenie is for the girls, nice guys like Beenie Man and him even act like girl sometimes. Him go pan Ru Paul Show and say him wi do anything fi him career, tell me what Ru Paul have fi do wid music, him is no celebrity, him have no fans, Beenie Man said him do it fi enhance him career. Him go pan Ru Paul show and hug him up...
and now him do a song that me a sing wid naked man, now tell me is when Gwen (Stephani from No Doubt) turn naked man, him mind too corrupt and fool, there is a naked man in the video but he ain't wid me and dat is a different scene. So me no know what him a chat bout.
(The Germaican Observer - Octobre 2001).
Bounty Killer interview No.1
More on the video can be read in this interview: Bashment Vibes - 2002. Bounty Killer interview No.2
People oppinion on the NoDoubt video: Jamaica Gleaner - January 2002.
Bounty Killer interview No.2



BEENIE MAN (on Bounty Killer and The RuPaul Show)
He's a faggot in disguise and people don't see that. I can see that because I can see him in the video with No Doubt with some freaky ring on is finger calling a naked man to dance for him. He always cusses me. I went to a Ru-Paul show and Bounty Killer cussed me off. All I did was shake Ru-Paul's hand - I didn't even talk to the nigger. But I was at his show. What the f**k am I supposed to do? Be like a pu**y? I didn't want to uphold the stereotype of an ignorant, illiterate Jamaican so I shook his hand. There's nothing wrong with that. Bounty Killer is a bad mind faggot. He tricks people and makes them believe he is this hardcore ni***r and his really not hardcore. Look at his video. Show me your friends and I tell you who you are - you see what I'm saying. I control my own image. How can you see a naked man in my video when I control my own image? It's crazy. (Club Vibes Magazine - February 2002). Beenie Man interview



BEENIE MAN (on Bounty Killer "riding on a h-o-r-s-e")
Jamaican reggae MCs Beenie Man and Bounty Killer narrowly avoided bloodshed between their opposing camps only after Beenie Man explained on radio that he had referred in a song to the Killer riding "on a h-o-r-s-e", and it wasn't his fault that the word is pronounced "a-r-s-e" in Jamaican dialect. (The Guardian - October 2002). Note: after researching the web for a while, I wasn't able to find the name of the song the reporte is refering to.

 

2011: EENIE MAN & BOUNTY KILLER
According to an article read in ReggaeFrance.com, Beenie Man and Bounty Killer are back to their old habits of attacking each other through songs, and this seems to imply sexual tendecies. I haven't made reaserch about this one, but several songs are listed in the french article below. The songs 'Run Ina War' (by Bounty Killer) and 'Cah Puff Mi Chest' (by Beenie Man)
(ReggaeFrance – September 28, 2011) (
article)



1993: Even subsequent "apologies", failed to revive the international careers of Shabba and Buju to their former potential. Adding injury to insult, the Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation (GLAAD) mounted a protest demonstration outside the Apollo Theatre in Harlem in 1993, forcing the cancellation of a scheduled performance there by Buju Banton. That could never have happened in Jamaica.
Several concerts were cancelled all across North America and Europe, due to gay and Lesbian organizations’ pressure. When money is involved, people are willing to make a lot of compromises. These are a few examples that I found on the Internet about "official" statement sent by record companies or the artists themselves being pushed by their records companies. In May/June 2007, I learned an important news that Beenie Man, Sizzla, Capleton and Buju Banton have all signed the 'Reggae Compassionate Act', documents stating that they will no longer performed or write songs that discriminate gays and lesbians. The document also state that they will no re-issue past materials that incite discrimination or hatered towards gays and lesbians. Let's hope they honour their signatures. •
.
.
.

MARCH 2007: The 'Reggae Compassionate Act' is available to be signed for any artist that want to move on with their homophobic past. Click lower to see an example of the contract. Any major Europeen reggae promotors should have access to the contract. I am still looking for an official phone or email address for any manager that would like to get a copy for their artist. I have found a list of people that got invloved in the contract.

So far, Beenie Man, Sizzla, Capleton, Buju Banton, Elephant Man and TOK signed it, who did really respect his commitment? From my readings, only TOK respect their signatures and that information would need to be double checked by J-FLAG and and Peter Tatchell to befully sure.

(The Reggae Compassionate Act) (Contact information for the contract)